Women-Directed/Photographed Films Coming to Theaters: September 2017

Director/screenwriter/producer Gurinder Chadha and cinematographer Ben Smithard on the set of Viceroy’s House, 2015.

Here are thirty-three new movies due to be released in theaters or via other viewing platforms this September, all of which have been directed and/or photographed by women. These titles are sure to intrigue cinephiles and also provoke meaningful discussions on the film world, as well as the world in general.

(I know this post is coming out later than usual since September is already halfway over, but better late than never!)

SEPTEMBER 1: Dalida (dir. Lisa Azuelos)Pathé International synopsis:From her birth in Cairo in 1933 to her first concert at the Olympia in Paris in 1956; from her marriage to Lucien Morisse, director of the newly emerging Europe 1 radio to the height of the disco scene; from her journey of discovery to India to the international success of “Gigi L’Amoroso” in 1974, Dalida is a touching and tragic portrait of an emotionally complex woman who was born to be a star. An unconventional modern woman living through conventional times. Despite her tragic death in 1987 Dalida’s extraordinary presence and talent continue to live on.

SEPTEMBER 1: I Do… Until I Don’t (dir. Lake Bell)Synopsis from the film’s official website: “In Vero Beach, Florida, a trio of couples at various points in their relationships become the subjects of a film about marriage being an antiquated idea that needs a reboot: Why not turn marriage into a seven-year deal with an option to renew?

“For Alice and Noah (Lake Bell, Ed Helms), more than a hint of boredom is setting in as they approach their first decade together and the prospect of parenthood. Meanwhile, Alice’s funky sister Fanny (Amber Heard) is sure her ‘open marriage’ to Zander (Wyatt Cenac) is the key to their free-spirited happiness. And then there’s Cybil and Harvey (Mary Steenburgen, Paul Reiser), a pair of empty-nesters wondering what the next stage will be.

“As the manipulative filmmaker (Dolly Wells) attempts to show how marriage is outmoded, the couples she interviews discover the ‘do’s’ and ‘don’t’s’ in their own relationships.

I Do…Until I Don’t is Lake Bell’s directorial follow-up to her acclaimed 2013 film In a World.

SEPTEMBER 1: Jesús (dir. Fernando Guzzoni) (DP: Barbara Alvarez)Cinema Village synopsis: “Nothing comes easily to Santiago teen Jesús. His group has just lost the local battle of the boy bands, he can’t seem to finish high school or keep track of money, and his widower father is fed up with his inertia. Uncertain what path to take, Jesús is trapped in a dead-end cycle of getting wasted with his buddies and looking for trouble.

“One night, the boys are partying in a cemetery when things get out of hand. The boys gang up on a defenseless kid, beating him badly. The next day, Jesús learns that the kid’s in a coma, and the police are searching for those responsible. Desperate to avoid both the authorities and his friends, he has no choice but to turn to his father for help. But how far should a father be expected to go to protect a child when that child is as lost as Jesús?

Jesús is loosely inspired by true events that occurred in Santiago, Chile, where Daniel Mauricio Zamudio, a gay man, was beaten and tortured for several hours in a park in downtown Santiago. After being attacked by four men, Zamudio died 25 days later after being in a coma. Zamudio has become a symbol against homophobic violence in Chile.”

SEPTEMBER 1: Kill Me Please (dir. Anita Rocha da Silveira)Variety’s SXSW Film Festival review by Dennis Harvey: “Teen sexual exploration and the coming-of-age tale are first-feature cliches, but such is the range of human experience (and art) that there’s always room for a new vision to make that familiar territory seem fresh. The Brazilian film Kill Me Please offers a bracingly distinctive turn on those well-worn themes by chronicling a group of adolescent girls’ hormonally restless summer during a wave of murders in their West Zone neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. Anita Rocha da Silveira’s arresting debut feature captures the queasy mix of desire and fear among kids who are sexually inexperienced, yet can think of little else. Pop kitsch, social satire, dreamy narrative unreliability and retro giallo-thriller vibes further flavor a movie at once bold and cryptic. Likely to incite strong if uneven critical response (as well as sales interest), it certainly marks its director as a talent to watch.

“Still in school during the onerous heat of the season, our 15-year-old heroines run in a pack: There’s central protagonist Bia (Valentina Herszage), gossipy Michele (Julia Roliz), flirtatious Mariana (Mariana Oliveira) and slightly overweight, insecure Renata (Dora Freind). They all live in nearby apartment blocks, where Bia’s older brother Joao (Bernardo Marinho) is nearly always at home — though their mother almost never is. (Indeed, adults are nowhere to be seen in this film’s exclusively teenaged psychological and social universe, with even teachers kept off-screen.)

“The usual adolescent fascination with all things sexual and/or icky is in collective hyperdrive at present, because their own Barra da Tijuca district is being plagued by murders — young women being found stabbed and/or strangled to death in the open fields between major roads and the massive apartment complexes. Police are as yet uncertain whether there’s one killer or more. That lack of known suspects or other intel feeds into the kind of thrilled, paranoid urban-mythologizing that impressionable minds (especially Michele, who repeats and embellishes every tall tale she hears) thrive on.

“…Disdaining any conventional murder-mystery satisfactions, Kill Me Please ends with a striking image that underlines how its use of serial-killer horror tropes is meant to be taken less literally than metaphorically. The film itself occupies a fever state of mercurial adolescent emotions and curiosities, propelled by the urgent romantic yearnings of dance-pop lyrics, dreamlike narrative ellipses and a sinister sensuality that extends even to the views of mangled corpses. Yet unlike the standard slasher template, there’s no air of misogynist exploitation here. Da Silveira’s view of developing female sexuality eschews any sense of simple, titillating victimhood for a mindset in which girls’ imaginations and actions can be just as aggressive (both erotically and otherwise) as any boys’.

“That internal volatility, as well as a generous streak of humor, allows Kill Me to get away with a lot of outré tactics, from periodically having the protagonists simply stare at the camera (perhaps standing in for a mirror) to a spontaneous playground dance number. It also sustains the movie beyond its midpoint peak of a princessy classmate’s birthday party at which all macabre, campy and standard teen-flick elements collide in a perfect storm of controlled excess.

“Da Silveira demonstrates masterful control over a complicated tonal and aesthetic palette, boasting fine contributions from all her collaborators, with visual and sonic elements equally highly worked.”

SEPTEMBER 1: Viceroy’s House (dir. Gurinder Chadha)Pathé International synopsis:British rulers of India. After 300 years, that rule was coming to an end. For 6 months in 1947, Lord Mountbatten, great grandson of Queen Victoria, assumed the post of the last Viceroy, charged with handing India back to its people. Mountbatten lived upstairs together with his wife and daughter. Downstairs lived their 500 Hindu, Muslim and Sikh servants. As the political elite took their seats to wrangle over the birth of independent India, conflict erupted throughout the House and a catastrophic decision was taken with global repercussions. Partition – the decision to divide India and create the new Muslim homeland of Pakistan – led to the largest mass migration in human history.

“The film is deeply personal to the director whose own family was caught up in the tragic events that unfolded as British rule came to an end. Her film examines those events through the prism of both a marriage – that of Louis (Hugh Bonneville) and Edwina Mountbatten (Gillian Anderson) – and a romance – that between a young Hindu servant, Jeet (Manish Dayal), and his intended Muslim bride, Aalia (Huma Qureshi). The young lovers find themselves caught up in the seismic end of Empire, in conflict with the Mountbattens and with their own communities, but never ever giving up hope…”

SEPTEMBER 6: Spettacolo (dirs. Jeff Malmberg and Chris Shellen)Quad Cinema synopsis: “From the makers of the acclaimed documentary Marwencol (soon to be a fictionalized feature from Robert Zemeckis) comes another astonishing nonfiction portrait of the line between fantasy and reality. For five decades, the residents of a small Tuscan hill town have turned their piazza into stage, putting on an original play based on their own lives. But as the aging population passes away, the town’s 50th anniversary production may just be its last.”

SEPTEMBER 8: Boris Without Beatrice (dir. Denis Côté) (DP: Jessica Lee Gagné)KimStim synopsis: “The latest feature film by Québécois filmmaker Denis Côté (Carcasses, Curling, Vic + Flo Saw a Bear), Boris Without Beatrice is a morality tale with fairy-tale inflections that focuses on Boris Malinovsky, an affluent, successful businessman who comports himself with an extreme degree of pride and arrogance. When his wife, a Minister of the Canadian Government, is rendered nearly catatonic by a mysterious depression, it triggers a series of events that brings Boris to the point of professional, personal, and even existential crisis. His attempts to repair his relationships with his wife and estranged daughter are complicated by his affair with a colleague, and the dangerous relationship that develops with his young housekeeper. And to make matters worse, Boris has to contend as well with an enigmatic, threatening, and uncannily all-knowing figure, played – with typical relish and theatrical flair – by the great Denis Lavant. Boris Without Beatrice is at once a sharply observed character study, an unsparing portrait of the moneyed classes, and an audaciously dark fable.”

SEPTEMBER 8: Company Town (dir. Natalie Kottke-Masocco and co-dir. Erica Sardarian)Synopsis from the film’s official website: “What do you do when the company you work for, and live near, is making you sick? Company Town is a groundbreaking investigative documentary that tells the story of a modern day David vs. Goliath.

“Filmed nearly four years, following one man’s journey to save his town. He’s up against one of the nation’s largest paper mill and chemical plants, Georgia-Pacific, owned by billionaire brothers Charles Koch and David Koch of Koch Industries, a company neighbors worked their entire lives for making products like, Angel Soft, Brawny Paper Towels, Quilted Northern, and Dixie paper cups.

“He galvanizes the town, revealing untold stories of cancer and illness. A whistleblower bravely steps forward shedding light on Georgia-Pacific’s egregious business practices.

“A rare look inside one hidden American town, where the company rules and the government’s negligence pushes them to stand up and fight for justice. Crossett, Arkansas represents all towns across America polluted by big business.”

SEPTEMBER 8: Free in Deed (dir. Jake Mahaffy) (DP: Ava Berkofsky)Synopsis from the film’s official website: “Set in the distinctive world of storefront churches, and based on actual events, Free in Deed depicts one man’s attempts to perform a miracle. When a single mother brings her young boy to church for healing, this lonely pentecostal minister is forced to confront the seemingly incurable illness of the child… and his own demons as well. The more he prays, the more things seem to spiral out of his control.”

SEPTEMBER 8: Home Again (dir. Hallie Meyers-Shyer)Synopsis from the film’s official website:Home Again stars Reese Witherspoon (“Big Little Lies,” Wild, Walk the Line, Sweet Home Alabama) as Alice Kinney in a modern romantic comedy. Recently separated from her husband (Michael Sheen), Alice decides to start over by moving back to her hometown of Los Angeles with her two young daughters. During a night out on her 40th birthday, Alice meets three aspiring filmmakers who happen to be in need of a place to live. Alice agrees to let the guys stay in her guest house temporarily, but the arrangement ends up unfolding in unexpected ways. Alice’s unlikely new family and new romance comes to a crashing halt when her ex-husband shows up, suitcase in hand. Home Again is a story of love, friendship, and the families we create. And one very big life lesson: Starting over is not for beginners.”

SEPTEMBER 8: Lipstick Under My Burkha (dir. Alankrita Shrivastava)Hollywood Reporter’s Tokyo International Film Festival by Deborah Young: “While overtly feminist films have been trending for some time in the Arab world, in India none are as bold and colorful as Alankrita Shrivastava’s second feature, Lipstick Under my Burkha. Despite its catchy title, not all the characters are Muslim or wear a burkha. But the metaphor holds for all of these freedom fighters as they seek personal and sexual liberation from domineering husbands, overbearing boyfriends and a claustrophobic society. Bright and breezy, the M-appeal release is aimed at women and could find some art house dates after its festival showcases. In Tokyo, where it premiered just before Mumbai, it won the Spirit of Asia award.

“In India, Bollywood vulgarity is OK but onscreen kissing is an issue and nudity is limited to art films aimed at foreign audiences. In this context, Lipstick is audaciously outspoken about women’s sexual desires and fantasies, both visually and verbally. All this is pretty tame stuff in the West, but one wonders how the Hindi-language film will be received locally and whether its frankness will be cause for scandal. Its quartet of neatly interwoven stories, shot in vivid pop art colors, have a gentle humor that takes some of the sting out of the outrageous way the women are treated.

“Writer-director Shrivastava, whose first feature was the girl-loses-boy tale Turning 30!!!, casts her net wide to include four Indian women of different ages and backgrounds. They hail from small-town India, depicted as a dusty palimpsest of time-worn back alleys and courtyards. Konkona Sen Sharma plays the warm, enterprising Shirin, a young mother of three whose husband has recently returned from working abroad. She tolerates his loveless love-making with gritted teeth, but hides from him the fact she’s earning good money as a door-to-door saleswoman.She rightly suspects he won’t approve.

“Leela (Aahana Kumra), an ambitious beautician, offers herself as a bridal consultant in tandem with her Muslim photographer boyfriend Arshad. Her open desire for him leads to several sex scenes where she takes the lead, even filming one of them on her phone to use as blackmail in case he ever decides to dump her. Meanwhile she reluctantly lets her family get her engaged to a nice, well-to-do Hindi boy, who tells her he wants their home to be so comfortable she’ll never have to set foot outside it.

“The other two stories are the most curious. In one, college freshman Rehana discovers the sensual world of perfume, clothes, music, drinking, parties and boys, but has to hide it all from her strict Muslim parents. Ironically, they keep her sewing burkhas all night in their tailoring shop, while Cinderella dreams of dancing in the disco. As Rehana, newcomer Plabita Borthakur is a one-woman cultural contrast, a caged bird itching to taste the world but too inexperienced to avoid its traps and pitfalls.

“The film dips into outright comedy in the tale of Auntie Usha, delightfully played by veteran actress Ratna Pathak Shah in a multi-layered performance that is alternately pathetic and hilarious. It is she whose soft voice reads the story of “Rosy” offscreen in key moments of the film. Rosy is a character in the erotic women’s fiction to which Auntie is addicted. While the competent Usha takes care of her grandkids and fends off developers eager to demolish her historic home, her fantasy life is lustfully elsewhere, with Rosy. But when she develops a crush on a hunky life-guard that progresses to steamy phone sex, she gets in deep water. It would have been easy to fall into the grotesque in these scenes, something director and actress skillfully avoid all the way to a bitter but satisfying denouement.

“Akshay Singh’s cinematography is generally bright and busy, but he also skillfully uses color to set these daring women off from their conservative environment. Zebunnisa Bangash’s music adds rhythm to the scenes.”

SEPTEMBER 8: Motherland (dir. Ramona S. Diaz) (DPs: Clarissa de los Reyes and Nadia Hallgren)Cinema Village synopsis:Motherland takes us into the heart of the planet’s busiest maternity hospital in one of the world’s poorest and most populous countries: the Philippines. The film’s viewer, like an unseen outsider dropped unobtrusively into the hospital’s stream of activity, passes through hallways, enters rooms and listens in on conversations. At first, the surrounding people are strangers. But as the film continues, it’s absorbingly intimate, rendering the women at the heart of the story increasingly familiar. Three women—Lea, Aira and Lerma—emerge to share their stories with other mothers, their families, doctors and social workers. While each of them faces daunting odds at home, their optimism, honesty and humor suggest a strength that they will certainly have to summon in the years ahead.”

SEPTEMBER 8: Nobody’s Watching (dir. Julia Solomonoff)Film Forum synopsis: “Nico (a stunning Guillermo Pfening), is a 30-something actor who leaves a promising career in Argentina (where he stars in a T.V. soap) after a romantic break-up with his male married producer. Like many before him, cast adrift in New York City, Nico is thwarted in his efforts to land a job in either movies or on the stage. A smarmy agent advises him that Latinos are hot, but that he’s too blond and his accent has to go. Nico overstays his visa, juggles odd jobs (nannying for a wealthy friend; cleaning apartments) and engages in petty theft. Surprise visits from a former co-star and his ex-lover force him to reckon with his national, individual, and sexual identities. As the national debate on immigration focuses on border-crossing, Nobody’s Watching presents an alternative take on Latin America-US emigration. Solomonoff and Pfening, who won the Best Actor prize at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival, imbue this precarious, isolated experience with humor, warmth, and humanity.”

SEPTEMBER 8: School Life (dir. Neasa Ní Chianáin and co-dir. David Rane) (DP: Neasa Ní Chianáin)Synopsis from the film’s official website: “This observational documentary follows a year in the lives of two inspirational teachers at Headfort, the only primary-age boarding school in Ireland. Housed in an 18th century estate, school life embraces tradition and modernity. For John, rock music is just another subject alongside Maths, Scripture and Latin, taught in a collaborative and often hilarious fashion. For his wife Amanda, the key to connecting with children is the book, and she uses all means to snare the young minds. For nearly half a century these two have shaped thousands of minds, but now the unthinkable looms: what would retirement mean? What will keep them young if they leave?”

SEPTEMBER 8: Trophy (dirs./DPs: Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwarz)Synopsis from the film’s official website: “Each year, trophy hunters kill over six thousand grizzly bears on international hunts for their heads, paws and coats. Those that support this slaughter claim it’s necessary to maintain balance in nature and provide economic advantages, yet conservationists and activists say otherwise.

“Presented by Lush Cosmetics, Trophy challenges this controversial practice. In Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest, First Nations groups, activists and over 90% of British Columbians oppose this cruel and inhumane hunt, and yet it still remains legal and sanctioned by the BC government. South of Canada’s border, grizzlies in Yellowstone National Park are currently safe and protected under the Endangered Species Act, but that could soon come to an end. The US Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed ‘delisting’ grizzlies from the Act which could lead to sanctioned trophy hunts and other activities that would put these bears in danger.

“Diving deep into the controversy that exists within United States and Canada, Trophy asks: can we truly justify killing these animals for sport?”

SEPTEMBER 12: Wrestling Jerusalem (dir. Dylan Kussman) (DP: Nicole Hirsch Whitaker)Symphony Space synopsis: “In a tour-de-force performance, writer-actor Aaron Davidman conjures a host of different characters while seeking answers to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Wrestling Jerusalem. Creatively adapting his acclaimed one-man stage show using only simple props and backdrops, Davidman takes a multidimensional journey into the heart of the Middle East, and the intersection of politics, identity and spiritual yearning.

“He embodies and gives voice to 17 different characters on all sides of the existential divide-deftly moving between male and female, Jewish and Muslim, Israeli and Arab-modeling what it takes truly to bear witness through the eyes of the other. Challenging long-held beliefs with sharp and unblinking observation, Davidman finds both entrenched isolation and shared humanity in the shifting moral compasses and competing narratives of all his characters.

“Filmmaker Dylan Kussman moves freely and seamlessly among three locations-a live theater audience, the open expanse of a vast desert, and a small dressing room-exploiting the interplay of theatrical spontaneity, cinematic poetry, and spiritual intimacy. The result is a unique hybrid of stage and cinema that reignites hope for the future of this troubled region.”

SEPTEMBER 15: Alina (dir. Ben Barenholtz) (DP: Eun-ah Lee)Metrograph synopsis: “Ben Barenholtz, a legend and innovator of independent cinema in New York, presents Alina, an ultra low-budget film and his narrative feature debut at the age of 81. Alina follows the odyssey of a young Russian woman (played by Darya Ekamasova, one of Russia’s most accomplished actresses), who arrives in New York looking for her father, with only a 25-year-old photo in her possession to help. Filmed on location at the historic Russian Samovar, Alina is the long overdue directorial debut of one of the most important figures in independent cinema.

“Ben Barenholtz is a film producer, distributor and exhibitor, who programmed the legendary Elgin Theater, and can be thanked for the phenomenon of the midnight movie, introducing the concept to New York with El Topo and Eraserhead. As a producer and distributor, he is responsible for introducing the world to the films of the Coen Brothers, John Woo’s The Killer, John Sayles’ Return of the Secaucus 7, as well as many more.”

SEPTEMBER 15: Embargo (dir. Jeri Rice)Synopsis from the film’s official website:Embargo chronicles the story of the politics and collusion behind the Cuban embargo; its history, impact and evolution.

Embargo documents the journey of an American woman, Jeri Rice’s quest for truth, beginning with a rare encounter with Cuban President, Fidel Castro in 2002, when the Communist leader confesses to her that the utopia he tried to create, did not succeed and he was unable to fix it. Rice sets out to find out why her country’s unprecedented embargo of Cuba has persisted unabated, long after the Cold War.

“Along with information from recently declassified documents and original interviews with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Sergei Khrushchev, Ted Sorensen, and Lucie Arnaz—among others—an unprecedented array of historical, political, social and cultural perspectives is revealed. New insights into: the Fulgencio Batista-Richard Nixon- CIA connections; Nixon’s link to the failed Bay of Pig invasion; behind the scenes with Ted Sorensen during the Cuban Missile Crisis; Watergate and more….

“The film’s compelling truths ultimately link the threads of an untold history, as it exposes a foreign policy that has failed both countries. Now is a time of change between Cuba and the United States – forward or backward, and the future of the embargo hangs in the balance. A new Cold War developing with the threat of nuclear confrontations, Embargo’s relevance to today’s political climate is a perfect point to begin a new conversation.”

SEPTEMBER 15 (in theaters and streaming on Netflix): First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers (dir. Angelina Jolie)Rolling Stone review by Peter Travers: “Will wonders never cease. A film about Cambodia told from a Cambodian perspective instead of through the heroic intervention of white outsiders. Yes, that’s Angelina Jolie behind the camera, as director and co-writer, but First They Killed My Father, subtitled ‘A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers,’ steadfastly honors its first-person account. The film takes the point of view of Loung Ung (newcomer Sreymoch Sareum), who was only five years old when the Communist Khmer Rouge entered the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh in 1975, brutally executing fellow Cambodians with ties to the old regime and making life a living hell for Loung, her parents and siblings. Loung’s memoir, published in 2000, is the basis for Jolie’s film. And except for Vietnam-era, Nixon footage, which Jolie uses to excoriate the U.S. role in the secret bombing raids on Cambodia, we stick with Loung, reading her harrowing story on the face of the extraordinary child who plays her.

“If Americans still have a hard time piecing together the byzantine civil wars of the time, image a child’s confusion. In a bold decision, Jolie lets us see only what Loung sees. The effect is shattering, as Loung’s father (Kompheak Phoeung) – a former member of the military police in the U.S.-backed government – is marked for death while she and her other family members are separated and forced to endure starvation rations and backbreaking labor in service to Angkar (the Khmer leadership). This also means Loung must bear witness to a genocide that wiped out a quarter of Cambodia’s population from 1975 to 1979. Jolie’s scenes of Loung being trained as a soldier are particularly chilling, especially when she is instructed in how to plant landmines and deliver a death blow.

“You can criticize Jolie and cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle for letting images that are merely picturesque poke through the suffering. But this film (in the Khmer language with English subtitles) is not a documentary. And the brightly colored dream sequences in which Loung imagines feasting at a banquet or being back at home with her family and her mother’s soup and crunchy pork seem reasonable for a child. Indeed, it’s the planned corruption of an innocent that gives the film its shocking resonance to what the Taliban is doing now.

“Jolie is often patronized as a humanitarian who makes worthy films to rouse an indifferent public, like that’s a bad thing. It also denies the visceral impact of her work and the artful shape of her compositions, as seen in Unbroken and In the Land of Blood and Honey. First They Killed My Father, which opens this week at the same time that it begins streaming on Netflix, is clearly a passion project for Jolie. Her adopted son Maddox, 16, was born in Cambodia and served as executive producer on the film. If there is such a thing as a cinematic labor of love, this is it.”

SEPTEMBER 15: The Future Perfect (dir. Nele Wohlatz) (DPs: Roman Kasseroller and Agustina San Martín)Excerpts from Film Comment piece by Devika Girish: “Nele Wohlatz’s films reside on the boundaries between different geographies and cinematic modes. The Argentina-based German filmmaker’s first feature, Ricardo Bär (2013), co-directed with Gerardo Neumann, is set quite literally at the border between Argentina and Brazil in a farming community populated by the Spanish-speaking descendants of German immigrants. When she and Neumann encounter resistance to making their documentary, what starts out as a character study of a young oddball farmer transforms into a wry commentary on the artifice of filming reality.

“In her second feature and solo debut, Wohlatz burrows even deeper into the spaces between cultures, languages, and identities. The Future Perfect is a semi-fictional film about the real life of its lead actress Xiaobin, a young Chinese immigrant newly arrived in Buenos Aires. As Xiaobin painstakingly learns Spanish to adapt to her new milieu, her coming-into-language becomes a coming-of-age of sorts. It’s an opportunity for her to rearticulate her identity and escape the social class she was part of in China, to rebel against her insular parents who refuse to integrate into Argentine culture, and to explore romance with an Indian immigrant, Vijay, with whom she shares nothing except broken Spanish.

“Shot with a sense of deadpan comedy, the film’s ingenious conceit is to hitch its storytelling to Xiaobin’s progress in language learning: as she learns new tenses in Spanish class, her narrative expands in parallel, moving from the past, to the present, to finally, the conditional future of the film’s title, which allows her to vividly imagine the possible paths her life might take. Wohlatz aptly renders the affectless speech and constricting alienation of an immigrant with plain, naturalistic photography and a functional mise-en-scène. It is a deceptively simple but layered enunciation of what it means to find oneself—as speaker, actor, and director—within a foreign language.”

SEPTEMBER 15: Manolo: The Boy Who Made Shoes for Lizards (dir. Michael Roberts) (DP: Nicola Daley)Landmark Sunshine Cinema synopsis: “This playful and breezy documentary reflects the puckish sense of humor and obsession with style and beauty of its subject, the unique designer of high fashion shoes, Manolo Blahnik. Born in the Canary Islands, he moved to Paris to become a set designer; on a visit to New York in 1970 he showed his theater designs to Diana Vreeland, then editor-in-chief of American Vogue, who encouraged him to concentrate on shoes. He began making shoes in London in 1971, and soon became world famous. In the ‘90s his shoes were popularized by frequent mentions on ‘Sex and the City’ as a favorite of Sarah Jessica Parker’s Carrie Bradshaw character. When it came to what Marie Antoinette should wear on her dainty feet, only Manolo’s designs would do for director Sofia Coppola. This delightful behind-the-scenes peek into Manolo’s world features commentary from a ‘who’s who’ of some of the most notable figures in the fashion and entertainment worlds.”

SEPTEMBER 15: Red Trees (dir. Marina Willer)Quad Cinema synopsis: “In this moving personal history, filmmaker Marina Willer traces the remarkable story of her father’s family through the perils of World War II. After becoming one of only 12 families to survive the Nazis’ occupation of Prague, Willer’s ancestors fought through bureaucratic nightmares and personal tragedies to land in Brazil, where her father rebuilt his life as an architect. Gorgeously photographed by City of God’s César Charlone, Red Trees offers a timely account of emigration in the face of war.”

SEPTEMBER 15: The Wilde Wedding (dir. Damian Harris) (DP: Paula Huidobro)Vertical Entertainment synopsis:Iconic movie star Eve Wilde (Glenn Close) is getting married for the fourth time, raising concerns with her three grown sons and her ex-husband, Laurence (John Malkovich). As the entire extended family pours in to witness the nuptials of Eve and Harold (Patrick Stewart), the long summer weekend offers the opportunity for everyone to get to know each other a bit more intimately. As sexual sparks begin to fly, there are unforeseen consequences abound.

SEPTEMBER 22: Battle of the Sexes (dirs. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris)Toronto International Film Festival review by Cameron Bailey: “The 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs was a turning point in the politics of their game. Scripted by Academy Award winner Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire) and directed by Valerie Faris and Jonathan Dayton (Little Miss Sunshine), Battle of the Sexes is a rousing recreation of that moment, featuring winning performances from leads Emma Stone and Steve Carell.

“King (Stone) is a champion athlete and an outspoken feminist in her professional life, but her personal life is a struggle. Her marriage is failing. Her closeted sexuality feels like a distraction. Outraged that the National Tennis League won’t allow equal pay for men and women, King founds her own tour with Gladys Heldman (Sarah Silverman) as manager. Riggs (Carell) is decades removed from his last championship. Facing dwindling finances and desperate to win back his ex-wife (Elisabeth Shue), he proposes a publicity-snaring challenge: a $100,000 winner-take-all match. King is more than game.

“The film reminds us just how much blatant sexism pervaded the so-called sexual revolution. But it also shows the great strides made by trailblazers like King.

“Bursting with colourful period production design and costumes, Battle of the Sexes is as fleet and fun as it is politically acute, and Stone and Carell make hugely enjoyable adversaries.”

SEPTEMBER 22: Bobbi Jene (dir. Elvira Lind)Quad Cinema synopsis: “After spending a decade in Israel with the famed troupe Batsheva, American dancer Bobbi Jene Smith makes the difficult decision to return to her native San Francisco. While struggling to maintain a long-distance relationship with a fellow dancer back in Israel, she begins work on a highly personal new piece. Unprecedentedly winning of all three documentary prizes at the Tribeca Film Festival, this is a stunningly intimate portrait of artistry, ambition, and womanhood in the 21st century.”

SEPTEMBER 22: Close Relations (aka Rodnye) (dir. Vitaliy Manskiy) (DP: Alexandra Ivanova)Museum of the Moving Image synopsis: “In this follow-up to his award-winning documentary Under the Sun, filmmaker Vitaly Mansky examines Ukrainian society amidst the 2014 national election, a period rife with political chaos and growing uncertainty over national identity and integration. As both a Russian citizen and native Ukrainian, Mansky deftly underscores personal and political complexities as he visits with relatives living in Lvov, Odessa, the Crimean peninsula, and the Donbass region, and in the process discovers a wide and disorienting spectrum of outlooks and affiliations, including his own sense of ongoing exile and unease. Close Relations is at once an intimate family portrait and a graceful journalistic endeavor, a movie of the intense present that illuminates a place caught between a troubled past and an anxious future.”

SEPTEMBER 22: Loving Vincent (dirs. Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman)Excerpts from Hollywood Reporter’s Annecy International Animated Film Festival review by Jordan Mintzer: “There have already been quite a few films about Vincent van Gogh, ranging from the heroic (Lust for Life) to the dramatic (Vincent & Theo) to the enigmatic (Maurice Pialat’s masterly Van Gogh). All of them offer up their own interpretations of the artist’s brief and tumultuous life, which ended abruptly from suicide at the age of 37, after he had completed roughly 800 paintings in the span of less than 10 years.

“While such movies attempted to portray the painter through his actions and words, none have quite been able to reveal the man through his work. Such is the unique feat of Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman’s entirely hand-painted biopic Loving Vincent, a film that uses van Gogh’s canvases as both form and function, animating them into a saga tracing his last days in Arles, where he made his greatest artist breakthroughs, to his stay in Auvers-sur-Oise, where he died in 1890 after shooting himself in the torso.

“Or so goes the story. In this Polish-U.K. co-production, which took nearly seven years to complete, the death of van Gogh (played by Polish theater actor Robert Gulaczyk) turns into a murder mystery that revisits his suicide from multiple angles, with a young man named Armand Roulin (Douglas Booth), who was the subject of several portraits by the artist, serving as both detective and narrator. It’s a plot device that keeps the suspense afloat but can also feel somewhat manufactured, if not downright hammy, at times, turning the allusive van Gogh into the protagonist of a garden-variety crime novel.

“Still, there are enough traces of the artist himself in the movie, from his many paintings to the famous letters he wrote to his brother and benefactor Theo, to please both experts and newbies, who should enjoy watching his work come to life onscreen.

SEPTEMBER 22: The Tiger Hunter (dir. Lena Khan)Synopsis from the film’s official website:The Tiger Hunter is the story of Sami Malik (Danny Pudi), a young Indian who travels to 1970s America to become an engineer in order to impress his childhood crush and live up to the legacy of his father—a legendary tiger hunter back home. When Sami’s job falls through, he takes a low-end job and joins with a gang of oddball friends in hopes of convincing his childhood sweetheart that he’s far more successful than he truly is…or perhaps ever could be.”

SEPTEMBER 22: Unrest (dir. Jennifer Brea)IFC Center synopsis: “28-year-old Jennifer Brea is working on her PhD at Harvard and soon to be engaged to the love of her life when she gets a mysterious fever that leaves her bedridden and looking for answers. Disbelieved by doctors and determined to live, she turns her camera on herself and her community, a hidden world of millions confined to their homes and bedrooms by ME, or chronic fatigue syndrome.”

SEPTEMBER 22: Woodshock (dirs. Kate Mulleavy and Laura Mulleavy)A24 synopsis: “The exquisite feature film debut of visionary fashion designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy (Rodarte), Woodshock is a hypnotic exploration of isolation, paranoia, and grief that exists in a dream-world all its own. Kirsten Dunst stars as Theresa, a haunted young woman spiraling in the wake of profound loss, torn between her fractured emotional state and the reality-altering effects of a potent cannabinoid drug. Immersive, spellbinding, and sublime, Woodshock transcends genre to become a singularly thrilling cinematic experience that marks the arrival of the Mulleavy siblings as a major new voice in film.”

SEPTEMBER 27: I Am Another You (dir./DP: Nanfu Wang)Quad Cinema synopsis: “Chinese documentarian Nanfu Wang, director of the Oscar-shortlisted Hooligan Sparrow, returns with a probing character study that gradually turns into a gripping mystery. While traveling through Florida, Wang meets Dylan, a charismatic young drifter who’s left behind bourgeois comfort for a scrappy life of intentional homelessness. But as she follows Dylan and adopts his vagabond lifestyle, she discovers that darker truths lurk behind both this enigmatic young man and the American myth of individualism.”

SEPTEMBER 29: The Pathological Optimist (dir. Miranda Bailey)Cold Iron Pictures synopsis: “In the center of the recent Tribeca Film Festival scandal surrounding his film Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Controversy stands Andrew Wakefield, discredited and stripped of his medical license for his infamous study suggesting a link between the MMR vaccine, bowel disease, and autism. The Pathological Optimist takes us into the inner sanctum of Wakefield and his family from 2011- 2016 as he fights for his day in court in a little known defamation case against the British Medical Journal. Wakefield attempts to clear his name as the media-appointed Father of the Anti-vaccine movement. Director Miranda Bailey weaves a delicate portrait of a man who is The Pathological Optimist utilizing a never-before-seen, full access look at the man at the center of one of the biggest medical and media controversies of our times.”

SEPTEMBER 29: Stopping Traffic (dir. Sadhvi Siddhali Shree)Cinema Village synopsis: “With the instant reach of social media and the explosion in cyber porn, a child sex slave can be purchased online and delivered to a customer more quickly than a pizza. Stopping Traffic: The Movement to End Sex Trafficking initiates the conversation on a difficult topic to discuss – with raw images and heart-wrenching stories – through the eyes of survivors, veteran activists, front-line rescue and aid organizations and celebrities who are lending their names and clout to launch a movement to end this modern-day form of slavery in the U.S. and abroad.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s